What does Oneness Mean in the Context of Tibetan Buddhism?





The source and basis of what we call onenss or unity is ultimately the mind., it is a way of thinking. The Tibetan Buddhist perspective of this concept is influenced by their current socio-historical situation. Tibetans have recently endured a great deal of adversity.

Over a hundred-thousand Tibetans have had to recently resettle in India and other countries.

This refugee community has survived by replying on the concept of oneness, of a unified Tibetan people.

In a similar way, Tibetan Buddhists have begun to view, understand, and respond to their own religious tradition with a heightened sense of oneness [non-sectarianism]. 

For example, in our society within the general large assemblies we have very little freedom to pass binding laws, implement large changes, or sustain major projects. As members of a government, we have few legal rights, and there is little holding us together politically. Yet, even so, our society has been able to live in a unite way, a way of oneness. 

This is due to our trust in one another, our shared hopes, and our faith. This is how we are able to remain united as a culture and people. 


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